Scream 1×10 ‘Revelations’: “Don’t trust anyone.”

scream-season-finale-2015-4-550x366

With a very needed dedication to Wes Craven at the beginning of the episode, who sadly passed away this past Sunday, MTV’s Scream concluded its first season last night with a few twists up its sleeve (which some viewers probably saw coming, but hey). Whether or not this final episode is technically good or not, the main aspect people will be talking about is what the writers will decide to do with season 2 and how they’ll make it…you know…good.

This week’s episode starts right where last week’s left off, at the Halloween dance. Kieran is gone somewhere unknown, Audrey is off at Brooke’s Halloween party, and the Sheriff is captured and tortured by the killer on video for everyone at the dance to see.

The first half, perhaps even the first 3/4 of the episode are intense and have decent momentum. Emma gets a call from the killer minutes into the episode, who threatens to make this night the big, gory finale that all the murders have been leading up to. Well…there’s certainly a lot of screaming. And some blood. True, the Sheriff’s death is gross and is a huge blow, especially since he was a pretty good guy. But then after him, one person at Brooke’s party is killed. And then everyone else gets a wound of some sort. So…where was all the blood and gore this killer was spitting about?

MTV

MTV

To bring in the films for a moment (especially since I re-watched the first two recently), those films, even the not so good ones (I’m looking at you, Scream’s 3 and 4) always had a pretty high body count, and wasn’t totally afraid to kill off big characters and to have essentially all of the main character’s friends dead at the end of the film (this most notably happens in Scream 2). Now the show did have some shocking deaths (Will, Riley, the Sheriff), but it’s very obvious that the writers couldn’t, or simply didn’t want to, kill off anymore characters so they could stick around for the next season. Understandable, but they must have realized that by not killing off more substantial characters, the finale would be disappointing to some viewers.

Before the ranting becomes unstoppable, let’s talk about the reveal of the killer (and yes, I absolutely called it). Piper Shaw, the one who Emma grew to trust the most, is the one who ended up being the killer, and the child of Brandon James. For anyone else who suspected Piper for a good portion of the season had to have known from the moment that Piper said “Don’t trust anyone” to Emma that she was the killer and Brandon James’ daughter. The reveal is okay, the actress amps up the crazy to make things a little more fun (as every killer from the Scream films do). But again, for those who already knew that it was Piper, it’s not as surprising a twist as it could be. That’s why the actual twist is much more shocking.

As the writers of this show love to remind us, there’s still a lot we don’t know. The real twist at the very end of the finale heavily suggests that Audrey is Piper’s accomplice. Despite the fact that we see her burning letters she received from Piper, it’s still wise to take this ending with a grain of salt. Obviously there was something going on between Piper and Audrey, but why would Audrey be the definitive accomplice if there’s going to be a season 2? And why would Audrey kill Rachel, or be okay with Piper killing her? Maybe Audrey was pretending to have an alliance with Piper so she could get back at her for killing Rachel and she just burned the letters as a precaution. I’m banking on the fact that while Audrey is involved somehow, there’s still another killer we don’t know about.

MTV

MTV

And in regards to the next season, there’s really no clear idea on how it’s going to be continued. Since the child of Brandon James is dead, it’ll be hard for the writers to keep the whole Brandon James storyline interesting. It’s clear that they’ll probably go back to the actual murders that James supposedly committed and reveal who really killed those teenagers (it’s safe to say that Emma’s mom is involved somehow). But there’s only so much you can do with the past. The real test will be to see what the writers can do with the present; if new characters will be introduced (the town needs a new Sheriff after all), if the murders will start happening again, and who they’ll be willing to kill off.

 

In terms of the actual episode, the suspense and tension is decent until a certain point. While the Sheriff’s death is gruesome and goes along with the killers intention on making the night a blood bath, more blood and gore should have happened at Brooke’s party. The minute all of the teens run away from the party is when things start to loose momentum. I think it’s mainly because the one death at the party is so swift and it’s a character we’ve never met before until the party. There’s no real time to feel that these kids are truly in danger. That’s why Rose McGowan’s character was killed off during the party scene in the first Scream movie, to show that they have no problem killing off any number of supporting characters. 

Fans of the films will enjoy the subtle throwbacks, especially when Piper pops out of the water after appearing to have been killed by Audrey. The show was good at taking elements of the movies and cleverly incorporating them into the show without it being a carbon copy. While I do look forward to seeing what they’ll in the next season, the show would have been better off as an anthology series, like American Horror Story. It’s always risky dragging a storyline out, especially when there’s no benefit to it. Hopefully what the writers have cooked up for next season will be worth coming back to.

Sarah Lord

is a college student in New York City. Her extreme knowledge of British comedians and TV shows almost surpasses her general love for film. When she’s not sitting in her apartment/nerd cave reviewing movies and TV shows, she sometimes makes time for long walks in the moonlight. Check her out on YouTube, Twitter and Tumblr as TheSplord.

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