Schitt’s Creek 1×03 ‘Don’t Worry, It’s His Sister’: We all know what it looks like

Courtesy Pop TV

Right on the heels of last week’s decision to flip this town, Johnny Rose picks his first project to beautify Schitt’s Creek: get rid of the Welcome sign at the town limits, which channels everyone’s inner twelve-year-old. Plus, the other members of the family reluctantly become part of the community, one humiliating outing at a time.

 

What I find myself really enjoying so far about Schitt’s Creek is that it is simple. It’s not an insult at all; by that I mean the writers choose a very basic plot — like replacing the town sign or getting a job — and let the actors roll with it. (Not everything has to be as self-referential or influential as Community.) So here the Roses undertake some very minor projects, and it’s their reactions to them that are so funny, because they are completely absurd in the midst of all the mundanity.

Source: Pop TV

Source: Pop TV

Sure, it’s ridiculous that the town would welcome visitors by way of a painting depicting its ancestors in a compromising position, but it’s worth it to see Johnny flummoxed by being the odd man out in his interpretation. He can be very smug, so to see everyone put him in his place, even though they’re all “wrong,” is a welcome bit of humility. Especially when his suggestion to Roland is taken the wrong way, and makes the situation even worse. I like seeing all of the Roses learn that they can’t do everything the way they want or the way they used to, because that’s exactly what landed them in this mess in the first place.

Source: Pop TV

Source: Pop TV

As usual, my favorite story was Moira’s, thanks to Catherine O’Hara. Jocelyn asks her to come into her classroom as a guest speaker, to help them with their play. Moira’s on enough pills to happily accept, but obviously she takes over and treats the middle schoolers like she’s Stanislavski. I got flashbacks to the time Dee had to do the same on It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia. The fact that the “play” is actually an anti-drug campaign makes it all the better, because (inebriated) Moira treats it like it’s Shakespeare, and the kids’ horrified faces at her meltdown are a fantastic contrast. (Actually, now that I think about it, the Roses are basically a high-end version of the gang on Sunny.)

Source: Pop TV

Source: Pop TV

What is becoming clearer to me, now that we’re three episodes into the series, is that I don’t quite find David or Alexis’ behavior age-appropriate or amusing. I get that they’ve been spoiled and sheltered their entire lives, but they’d be more believable about ten years younger, particularly Alexis. David’s attempts to mingle with the locals — even if it’s by coercion from his father to get a job — at least gives him a bit of a personality, however outrageous, but I don’t find vapid Alexis enjoyable yet. Finding out her tailgate party conquest is dating café waitress Twyla doesn’t make me feel any sympathy for her, nor do I care if she ever hooks up with him again. On the other hand, watching David learn how to bag groceries was unexpectedly funny, though I don’t understand why businessman Johnny kept calling him at work, ultimately getting him fired.

Finally, I also like that they’re using the supporting cast more: not just Chris Elliot as Roland, but Jennifer Robertson as his wife Jocelyn, and Rizwan Manji as realtor/town councillor Ray. Again, their townie-ness gives the Roses great foils to play off of, and I can’t wait to see more.

is willing to talk about TV to anyone who will listen. She’s thought way too hard about her favorite shows, ever since her grade school days watching “Full House.” She likes to write a lot, about everything. She enjoys candlelight dinners and long walks on the beach… Whoops, wrong profile.

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